What has Behringer been up to this week?

It’s no secret to those in the music technology world that Behringer has been making a spectacle of its releases as of late. With mysterious yet exciting marketing campaigns, we’ve seen releases of the TD-3, WING, Wasp, Eurorack Go and Poly D. However, this week the company has been trickling out audio recording equipment and hints on an online marketplace with nothing more than a social media post. We take a brief look at what’s now available from the seemingly omnipresent manufacturer.

eBehringer?

MusicTribe, the parent company of Behringer, uploaded a short 15-second clip to YouTube this week that pretty much tells us they’re releasing an online music marketplace. All that it contains are sliding words across the screen: “Post, Offer, Buy, Sell, For Free”. Evidently, a rival for Reverb, the current champion marketplace of musicians, MusicTribe’s marketplace may appeal to some sellers who have been met with selling fees on other marketplaces.

Mic Check

The B906 was announced this week, which some Facebook users are speculating is Behringer’s take on the Sennheiser e906. This wouldn’t surprise many considering Behringer’s recent string of synth clones, and the design does appear very similar. Breaking it down to specs, though, the B906 is a dynamic microphone with a frequency response “designed for guitar amps, percussions and brass instruments”, according to the brand, with a super-cardioid polar pattern and switchable low-cut, flat and high-frequency boost. Safe to say, the two microphones carry a fair amount in common.

Behringer’s next mic is a PZM or boundary mic, the BA 19A. No doubt this is a take on Shure’s Beta 91A kick drum mic, a condenser with half cardioid polar pattern. The BA 19A takes on these traits, as well as an integrated preamp, switchable filters for stronger lows and high-frequency attack, high signal output and a frequency response that is designed for kick drums, piano and bass-heavy instruments. The Beta 91A weighs in at about €275, and no doubt Behringer’s version will undercut it dramatically.

Behringer Soundsystem

The Behringer C210B is a battery-powered column loudspeaker which some music fans are likening to the Bose L1 Compact system. Behringer’s speaker is a portable PA solution with high-quality music playback, sporting 6 hours of battery life at full playback power, with 10 hours available at 50% playback power with an integrated Li-Ion battery. The speaker uses 160 Watt power with multi-channel Class-D technology and offers Bluetooth streaming for playback. A 3-channel mixer provides individual gain controls and an LCD control interface is built-in for ease of navigation. The speaker is comprised of an 8-inch high excursion low-frequency driver and four 2.75-inch drivers with edge wound copper voice coils for high-frequency reproduction.

Audio Interfaces

The Behringer MIC2200 is a product that already exists, although this video seems to be teasing a version two of the vacuum tube mic/line preamp. Truth be told, there’s not much difference cosmetically, but Behringer has recently appeared to up its game with recent products, so this one should take the companies new skills and amp up this preamp. This model features bandwidth from 10Hz to 200kHz, with a fully tunable 12dB high-pass filter and mic input stage based on discrete, conjugate, transistor pair circuitry. Full specs are available here.

A version 2 of Behriner’s RX1602 is on the horizon, offering improved audio performance and auto-range power supply. The multi-purpose sub-mixer offers 16 balanced high-headroom line inputs, a low noise ULN design with the highest possible headroom. Dedicated balance and level controls are onboard, with a monitor/fx send control per section with a global master send control.

Finally, Behringer has announced the DI4000, a 4-channel active DI box. This is said by the company to feature an “ultra-flat frequency response due to renowned Behringer OT-1 transformers”, with impedance and signal matching for the direct connection of instruments to mixers and amps. Switchable input attenuation allows for input levels of up to +40dB, with a +20dB gain switch for pre-amplification of low-level signals. A phase reverse switch is featured to aid phase issues, with a switchable 9kHz high-cut filter for guitar applications, and a Ground Lift switch to eliminate ground loop problems.

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